Possession With Intent To Distribute Lawyer St. Louis. With drug laws becoming ever stricter in St. Louis, police and prosecutors are taking further steps to get convictions and put suspected drug dealers behind bars. One way they are achieving this goal is by charging more defendants with drug distribution charges, which have much greater penalties than simple drug possession charges and are also easier to include with other drug charges.

At Combs Law Group, our firm has been vigorously defending St. Louis residents from all walks of life who have been accused of drug charges for years. Our experienced attorneys specialize in creating personalized legal strategies for our clients that are tailor-made to get them the optimal results for their situations. Call us today at (314) 900-HELP to speak with a lawyer and schedule a free, confidential document review.

How Is “Intent To Distribute” Determined?

Missouri law, specifically MO RS 579.020, states that “knowingly possessing a controlled substance with the intent to distribute or deliver any amount of said controlled substance” is a class C felony. These charges are punishable by anywhere between 3 to 10 years in state prison, as well as a potential maximum fine of $10,000. An exception to this rule is if you were caught with 35 grams or less of cannabis–this makes possession with intent to distribute a class E felony, which carries a maximum sentence of four years’ imprisonment. Possession with intent charges can, and often are, placed in the same indictment with other drug charges in order to lengthen sentences.

As for what actually signifies “intent to distribute”, usually police and prosecutors define this by using circumstantial evidence. The general rule in Missouri is that the amount of drugs found must be substantial enough for a “reasonable person” to conclude that it was too much for personal use. This definition has been challenged in court, and produced various rulings over time: the 2003 case State v. Belton found that two pounds of cannabis was enough to prove that a defendant had the intent to distribute it, but three years later State v. McCleod overturned a possession with intent conviction for a man who was caught with 7.5 ounces of marijuana on his person. Circumstantial evidence is also heavily used to establish intent to distribute: for example, the presence of plastic bags, twist-ties, a scale, or loose cash is usually enough to support a charge.

Contact An Experienced St. Louis Drug Charges Lawyer

When you are facing drug possession charges in St. Louis that include an intent to distribute charge, you need to work with a criminal defense attorney that knows how to build a winning case on your behalf. The drug possession lawyers at Combs Law Group are experts when it comes to Missouri’s drug laws and are here to help you protect your rights and freedoms. Our firm prides itself on client satisfaction and guarantees that you will be able to speak with your attorney at any time to discuss the particulars of your St. Louis possession with intent to distribute case.

Time is of the essence when you are accused of any drug charge in Missouri. Contact us today and put Combs Law Group to work on your St. Louis drug possession with intent to distribute case as soon as possible.